James Cohan Gallery’s Flagship Chelsea Space Will Move to Tribeca in September 2019

 

 

James Cohan Gallery’s Flagship Chelsea Space Will Move to Tribeca in September 2019
James Cohan Gallery’s Flagship Chelsea Space Will Move to Tribeca in September 2019

James Cohan’s Chelsea flagship.

COURTESY TWITTER

James Cohan Gallery will relocate its flagship space in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood to Tribeca, where it will take up residence at 50 Walker Street in September 2019. The new two-level space will measure 9,000 square feet. (The gallery will continue to operate a second space in Chinatown.)

Jane Cohan, the gallery’s co-owner, told ARTnews, “It’s the historic architecture of the area that makes the space—it’s the cast iron architecture. It kind of recalls the golden age of contemporary art dealing, I like to think. There was that moment in Soho in the ‘70s and ‘80s that was a beautiful time.” The move to Tribeca echoes that moment, she said.

The gallery has been at its current location on West 26th Street since 2002. It will continue to keep that space open through the summer of 2019, after which it will move to Tribeca and inaugurate its new digs in September with a Josiah McElheny solo show.

James Cohan, who co-owns the gallery, said, “There’s a certain migration out of Chelsea heading into TriBeCa. For me, it’s very simple, in that I feel like I’d rather work for my artists than for my landlord.”

That migration includes Andrew Kreps Gallery, which will depart Chelsea for a two-floor, 10,000-square-foot space in May of next year. Other New York galleries to have opened in Tribeca in recent years include Postmasters, the National Exemplar, Queer Thoughts, Ortuzar Projects, and Alexander & Bonin. The Bronx Museum of the Arts also revealed plans this year to open a venue in the neighborhood.

This article was written by cool news network.

 

 

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